Operation 100 km / h costs 8 million euros, delay in bad weather

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                              4000 road signs must be replaced along Dutch motorways within one weekend. If that is not possible due to bad weather, the speed reduction will be delayed for weeks. "This creates clarity for everyone", says Professor of Traffic Psychology Dick de Waard.

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        <p>In just over a month it will really happen: the speed limit on Dutch motorways is going down <a href="https://www.rtlnieuws.nl/nieuws/politiek/artikel/4941951/verlaging-maximumsnelheid-100kmu-stikstofcrisis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">to 100 kilometers per hour</a>. The reduction applies to all motorways from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The government is introducing the drastic measure to reduce nitrogen emissions. According to Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen (Infrastructure, VVD), the traffic decree is ‘necessary because this creates space for construction and infrastructure projects, as well as for improving nature’, she wrote in a parliamentary letter.

Long weekend

This decision leads to a major operation for Rijkswaterstaat. The road manager thinks it will take a long weekend to adjust around 4000 signs. The job is scheduled for Thursday, March 12 from 9 p.m. to Monday, March 16, 5 p.m.

The replacement of the plates will cost 7 to 8 million euros, says Rijkswaterstaat to RTL Z.

The agency is still discussing the exact price with contractors. The operation must environmentally friendly. The contractors have therefore agreed to produce as little waste as possible. The plates they replace are reused.

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                                        <h2>Here they make the new traffic signs</h2>







                                        <span class="image-caption">Back to 100 km / h: here they make the new traffic signs.</span>
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        <h2>End of patchwork</h2>

The new speed limit with accompanying signs will ensure more safety, expects road safety professor Marjan Hagenzieker from TU Delft. According to her, this puts an end to the ‘patchwork’ of maximum speeds that currently applies on the motorway.

Hagenzieker: “Many people complain that they no longer know where they stand. Moreover, less variation in speeds makes road handling more predictable. Now it may be that one car drives 90 and the other 130, that difference will soon be much less big.”

Procrastination?

There is a chance that the entire project will be postponed. “In the event of frost on the ground, snow or freezing rain, we shift the weekend,” says a spokesperson for Rijkswaterstaat.

It is not yet known at what time that decision will be made. It is certain, however, that the speed reduction in the event of delay will only start two weeks later, on Monday 30 March.

Clarity

Rijkswaterstaat needs a long weekend to replace all the signs. The reduction must be implemented nationwide in one go, for the sake of clarity.

A wise decision, says Dick de Waard, professor of traffic psychology and mobility preservation at the University of Groningen. “If you do it in one place on Friday and the other on Monday, that raises questions for motorists. So this creates clarity for everyone.”

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                                        <h2>Back to 100 km / hour: not nice, but cheaper</h2>







                                        <span class="image-caption">Back to 100 km / hour: not nice, but cheaper.</span>
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        <h2>"Half-hearted measure"</h2>

De Waard expects the speed reduction to ensure that traffic flows more evenly, becomes safer and that inserting and exiting becomes easier.

He doubts how much the traffic decision will have. “It is a half-hearted measure, because the reduction only applies during the day and not at night. If the government really wants to reduce nitrogen emissions, then that is no different at night than during the day. Then you have to be consistent and spend the whole day maintain a maximum speed of 100. ”

According to him, in that case you immediately get rid of another problem: the ‘bottom plates’ of traffic signs, with exceptions and additions. De Waard: “Many motorists find under-signs difficult and confusing.”

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                Tackling the nitrogen crisis: the government puts 'peak payers' under pressure
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