“Welcome back: we’ll see you again in one or two generations” – World

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“The fact that a former empire chooses to become a dwarf cannot be explained rationally,” writes MEP Kathleen Van Brempt in response to the impending brexit. “It is in everyone’s interest that we do not drift too far apart.”

The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union on 31 January. Of course that makes me very sad, but that may be due to my Anglophile attitude. I can’t help it, sometimes I even dream in English. I will miss my British Labor colleagues in the European Parliament, a particularly strong team who, with the well-known cocktail of British phlegmatics, perseverance and fair play, were an absolute asset to the parliamentary work. I saw one of my colleagues in recent weeks – extremely un-British – occasionally burst into tears because of the impending farewell. A lot of Remainers should feel that way later, I think, when a projected clock counts down on 10 Downing Street. There are not even a handful, but just about half of all Britons who prefer to stay in the EU.

What remains on 1 February is in any case a divided country, where – as the Prime Minister himself said – wounds must be healed and communities reunited. The concept of ‘united’ in the United Kingdom has a very bitter aftertaste. Meanwhile, the Scots are preying on a new independence referendum, curiously enough to become “less independent” and to be part of the European Union.

Welcome back: we’ll see you again in one or two generations.

It is sometimes said of our own country that it is a tribute to surrealism; the entire Brexitsaga can go the extra mile Monty Python’s Flying Circus an absurd theater play in which the hero claims to win a marathon and is constantly putting himself down. But where Monty Python is ultimately about self-relativity through humor, it’s a serious matter for Brexiteers. They seem to genuinely believe that in an increasingly globalizing world you are better off tackling the major geopolitical challenges on your own.

The European Union is just about the first – naturally imperfect – post-national response to globalization. No matter how difficult it is sometimes, there is a realization in our capitals that European countries can only influence the world stage if they work together. Shared influence and therefore also shared sovereignty ensure that we still have a role of some importance to play. In 1900, the European population still accounted for 25 pc of the world’s population, today 6 percent, in 2060 4 percent. No Member State will then have more than 1 percent of the world’s population. Dwarves among giants. That a former world empire chooses to become a dwarf cannot be explained rationally.

The Brexitre referendum was therefore not about ratio, although hard figures were used to juggle, for example, the British healthcare NHS could receive an additional £ 350 million in one fell swoop, an amount equivalent to what the British pay each week as a contribution to the EU. That turned out to be bad British humor. In reality, the Brexit – as Bloomberg calculated – has cost the UK more than 47 years in contributing to the European Union. The academic think tank UK in a Changing World calculated that in just about every scenario the British economy will do worse than if the British had stayed in the Union.

On January 31 the Brexiteers may cheer and hope that it is ‘finally’ over, but in reality the tricky part will only begin, namely reaching a trade agreement with the EU. For Johnson and the hardliners with the conservatives, that must be completed by the end of the year. It took three and a half years before the British could decide what they had already decided, namely that they would leave the Union. A trade agreement should be settled in 11 months. The withdrawal agreement from the EU provides that this period can be extended, but Johnson does not want to know.

This stubbornness suggests a hidden agenda, namely that the intention is to keep the trade deal with the EU as limited as possible or even intentionally to fail. A hard Brexit is therefore not excluded. If a trade agreement with the EU fails, Johnson hinted, he just makes a deal with the Americans. Such an Anglo-Saxon neo-liberal deal with watered down rules and standards that would make the UK a Singapore on the North Sea has a high fairy-tale content. UK exports to the EU accounted for 291 billion pounds in 2018, and 50 billion pounds to the US, which means that Johnson must increase exports to the US by 500 percent to replace a deal with Europe. Start it.

In the coming months, the Union will closely monitor that unfair competition between British and European companies is excluded. This means that the British must comply with the high European standards regarding the environment, working conditions, consumer protection or taxes. The further the British want to deviate from European standards, the harder a deal will become and the longer the negotiations will take. The negotiations will become fierce and complex.

It is today really coffee grounds where a trade agreement with Great Britain will land, if it already lands. The ideal is an agreement in which the UK is as close as possible to European regulations, not only because it would be most beneficial to the economies of both partners. After all, we know that Brexit was much more about emotion and identical politics than hard numbers. With just about half the population – especially the youngest generations – who are unhappy with the Brexit, it is not impossible that the British will want to join the Union again within one or two generations. I am convinced that this will happen in the long term. Then it is in everyone’s interest that we are not driven too far apart.

The first signs of a Rejoin campaign are already taking shape, which is strongly influenced by basic groups and British NGOs. The Rejoiners realize that it will be a long-term process, but are convinced that public opinion in the UK will tip over when the British are confronted with the difficulties that a hard-Brexit brings. The Fabian Society, the oldest British and progressive think tank said earlier that it is “highly likely” that the UK will join the EU again and last week the independent think tank called The Federal Trust to start a broad rejoin civil movement that Johnson can put on fire during the coming months.

Rejoin however, is not yet for tomorrow, but it will come. And then the British are more than welcome.

The United Kingdom is leaving the European Union on 31 January. Of course that makes me very sad, but that may be due to my Anglophile attitude. I can’t help it, sometimes I even dream in English. I will miss my British Labor colleagues in the European Parliament, a particularly strong team who, with the well-known cocktail of British phlegmatics, perseverance and fair play, were an absolute asset to the parliamentary work. Over the last few weeks I have seen one of my colleagues – extremely un-British – bursting into tears because of the impending farewell. A lot of Remainers should feel that way later, I think, when a projected clock counts down on 10 Downing Street. There are not even a handful, but just about half of all Britons who prefer to stay in the EU. What remains behind on 1 February is in any case a divided country, where – according to the Prime Minister himself – wounds must be healed and communities reunited. The concept of ‘united’ in the United Kingdom has a very bitter aftertaste. Meanwhile, the Scots are preying on a new independence referendum, curiously enough to become “less independent” and to be part of the European Union. It is sometimes said of our own country that it is a tribute to surrealism; the entire Brexitsaga may call itself the superlative of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, an absurd theater play in which the hero claims to win a marathon and constantly puts himself down. But where Monty Python is ultimately about self-relativity through humor, it is bitter seriousness for the Brexite people. They seem to genuinely believe that in an increasingly globalizing world you are better off tackling the major geopolitical challenges on your own. The European Union is just about the first – naturally imperfect – post-national response to globalization. No matter how difficult it is sometimes, there is a realization in our capitals that European countries can only influence the world stage if they work together. Shared influence and therefore also shared sovereignty ensure that we still have a role of some importance to play. In 1900, the European population still accounted for 25 pc of the world’s population, today 6 percent, in 2060 4 percent. No Member State will then have more than 1 percent of the world’s population. Dwarves among giants. The fact that a former empire chooses to become a dwarf cannot be explained rationally. Reasonably speaking, the Brexitre referendum did not, although hard figures were used to juggle the British healthcare NHS, for example, in a single blow 350 million a week. pounds extra, an amount equivalent to what the British pay each week as a contribution to the EU. That turned out to be bad British humor. In reality, the Brexit – as Bloomberg calculated – has cost the UK more than 47 years in contributing to the European Union. The UK in a Changing World academic think tank calculated that the British economy will do worse in just about every scenario than if the British had stayed in the Union. On January 31, the Brexiteers may cheer and hope that it is ‘finally’ over. , then the tricky part starts, namely the reaching of a trade agreement with the EU. For Johnson and the hardliners with the conservatives, that must be completed by the end of the year. It took three and a half years before the British could decide what they had already decided, namely that they would leave the Union. A trade agreement should be settled in 11 months. The withdrawal agreement from the EU provides that this period can be extended, but Johnson does not want to know. This stubbornness suggests a hidden agenda, namely that the intention is to keep the trade deal with the EU as limited as possible or even intentionally to fail. A hard Brexit is therefore not excluded. If a trade agreement with the EU fails, Johnson hinted, he just makes a deal with the Americans. Such an Anglo-Saxon neo-liberal deal with watered down rules and standards that would make the UK a Singapore on the North Sea has a high fairy-tale content. UK exports to the EU accounted for 291 billion pounds in 2018, and 50 billion pounds to the US, which means that Johnson must increase exports to the US by 500 percent to replace a deal with Europe. Just get started. The Union will closely monitor the coming months to prevent unfair competition between British and European companies. This means that the British must comply with the high European standards regarding the environment, working conditions, consumer protection or taxes. The further the British want to deviate from European standards, the harder a deal will become and the longer the negotiations will take. The negotiations will become fierce and complex. It is today really coffee grounds where a trade agreement with Great Britain will land, if it already lands. The ideal is an agreement in which the UK is as close as possible to European regulations, not only because it would be most beneficial to the economies of both partners. After all, we know that Brexit was much more about emotion and identical politics than hard numbers. With just about half the population – especially the youngest generations – who are unhappy with the Brexit, it is not impossible that the British will want to join the Union again within one or two generations. I am convinced that this will happen in the long term. Then it is in everyone’s interest that we are not driven too far apart. The first signs of a Rejoin campaign are already taking shape, which is strongly influenced by basic groups and British NGOs. The Rejoiners realize that it will be a long-term process, but are convinced that public opinion in the UK will tip over when the British are confronted with the difficulties that a hard-Brexit brings. The Fabian Society, the oldest British and progressive think tank, stated earlier that it is “highly likely” that the UK will join the EU again and last week the independent think tank called on the Federal Trust to start a broad rejoin civil movement that Johnson can put the heat on during the following months. Rejoin is not for tomorrow yet, but it will come. And then the British are more than welcome.

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