Kerala Governor approves disputed law, 5 years in jail for offending posts on social media

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Kerala Governor Arif Mohammad Khan on Saturday approved the controversial law (File)

Thiruvananthapuram:

of Kerala Governor Arif Mohammad Khan Has approved the disputed ordinance related to changes in police law. Opposition LDF Government Questioning this law, he said that it will give unnecessary and unlimited power to the police. This will also curb the freedom of the press. This law also has a provision of 5 years in jail on objectionable social media posts.

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Kerala Governor Arif Mohammad Khan has approved the disputed ordinance. The Left coalition LDF has increased the powers and powers of the police through this law. Under this, if a person is found guilty of abusive or defamatory posts on social media, a person can face 5 years in jail or a fine of ten thousand rupees or both.

The opposition is opposing these stringent provisions of the law. Sources in the government say that this ordinance will protect women and children, who fall prey to hateful statements and intimidation sentences on social media. The government says that such attacks on social media are also a threat to the physical and mental security of any person. Under the amended law, the police are allowed to take action in such cases by taking suo motu cognizance.

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However, opposition parties say that this law will give unlimited powers to the police unnecessarily and there is a possibility of its misuse. This will also hurt the press freedom. The state government can crack down on its critics through this law. Congress leader P Chidambaram has expressed surprise about this law by tweeting.

He wrote, the law passed by the Left Democratic Fund (LDF) government in Kerala is shocking. It provides for 5 years in jail for any objectionable post on social media. When the LDF government took this decision in October for changes in the Police Act 2011, the ally CPI also expressed concern over it.

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